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View Full Version : Is this the RIGHT way to break in a motor?



Ovrated
06-28-2005, 01:25 PM
I have searched for a few days, and havent found any great posts on this..

but while searching.. i found this site

http://www.mototuneusa.com/break_in_secrets.htm

it says to not take the break in slowly, and it has picture proof of why... im just curious as to what everyone else did..\

i just got done assembling a fully built motor, and i want to make sure it lasts along time...

so what do you guys think..

slow and easy,
or hard, and fast

Kookz
06-28-2005, 01:42 PM
Hard and fast.

Sil_40sx
06-28-2005, 02:17 PM
I did this to my 2002 Celica GTS, run it hard when I got it. We will see what happened later on. Anyway oil is clean every time I change oil at 3000 miles intervals. Dyno at 155 hp on R & D dyno at Gardena, highest dyno on Celica GTS on the internet is at 148 hp even magazine dyno. Was it due to this kind of break-in I don't know, this is the first time I see this article.

I just can't wait to drive it fast...LOL and Celica GTS engines is made with collaborations with Yamaha. http://forums.freshalloy.com/images/graemlins/grin.gif

champa
06-28-2005, 02:22 PM
my sponsor shop builds 1000 whp supras all the time. as soon as they are done building the car it goes straight on the dyno for break in, test, and max hp runs.

So does this Porsche shop we use to hold our dyno days at before they moved to CO. They build GT3 Porsches all day and run the cars hard after rebuilds.

TS4l
06-28-2005, 02:41 PM
I agree with the hard break-in, from all my research thats the best way. Only thing I recomend is letting it idle for 15 mins or so while you check the timing and then change the oil. May aswell get anything out of there that you missed when cleaning it! Then go boost it and have fun, I recomend doing so on a dyno first so you can check everything is in good working order in a controlled situation.

roycenagger
06-29-2005, 02:59 AM
I learned to break in motors this way as a teenager while rebuilding my '70 440 six pack Challenger R/T I had in 1981.
But I wasn't given the details this article has. Now it all makes sense.

-Royce

Taffy
06-29-2005, 07:52 AM
Break ins are more for the rings than anything else. How you break in your engine depends upon which rings you are running.

Vapor
06-29-2005, 10:19 AM
Break ins are more for the rings than anything else. How you break in your engine depends upon which rings you are running.



even the hardest rings are usually broken in after 100 miles.

This topic has been covered several times, I recommend searching more

Brad
06-29-2005, 11:37 AM
hmm it has been covered several times, but this is the first time ive heard of people doing the hard breakins and having it work. i remember everyone just going for the 100-500-1000 mile checks and driving slowly

JimStinksAtDorifto
06-29-2005, 12:05 PM
For engine break-in, I've always heard..

First time starting, crank the motor w/o fuel to get oil pressure. Then, idle it at 2k-2500 for 15-20 mins. Change oil. Begin to drive the vehicle using progressively more throttle and higher revs over a period of time (find an empty road and get to work for 30 mins or so). beat the crap out of it. Change oil at 500 miles.

For turbo motors, I've heard to do the same but use the lowest boost possible initially and then ramp it up progressively.

LoafY
07-13-2005, 12:48 AM
Sorry to keep bringing posts like this up, but I feel that there's a lot of good discussion going on here. There doesn't appear to be a whole lot of people who are backing the Mototune USA break-in procedure that have actually used such a method on a motor. There were a few posters in this thread that agreed with it, but either backed it with what a race team does (or similar purpose-built cars) or what they feel would work best. Has anyone actually done this on a street driven turbo car and seen the claimed results along with a normal amount of longevity from the motor?

The theory makes sense to me as much as it does to some of the rest of us I'm sure, but that honestly means nothing. I know what John posted in one of the other threads (found here (http://forums.freshalloy.com/ubbthreads/showflat.php?Cat=&Board=UBB9&Number=67823520) for you lazy bastards out there) is more like the traditional methods that most people are comfortable with (yet not quite as anal as some other methods.) If the motor will run better as indicated on the Mototune site, and I'll be able to drive the car as I intend to much earlier... that appears to be a win-win situation. If anyone has any personal experience that they can offer up backing what is stated here, that would be much appreciated.

2slow240sx
07-13-2005, 04:11 AM
My very dear friend had a drag car some years back.

It was a 502ci big block with forged pistons, a 15:1 compression and a 1300cfm carb. He sprayed 300hp in nitrous alone. The car ran 8.5x every time, launching from 4500rpm and trapping @ 8500rpm (on a big block!). He was hitting 15X mph in the 1/4.

When that motor was built, the break-in process was as follows:

Start engine.
Idle long enough to tune the carb.
Rev a few times.
Let engine idle to operating temp.
Hold accelerator to the floor a few times to reach redline.
Tow to the strip and run 8.5x's all day long.

This car ran the strip every weekend (during the season) and had new rings and bearings after about 30-40 races. Every time the rings were replaced, the old ones still looked new; same with the bearings. The engine never cut loose. It was run hard for years like this, then the car was sold and the engine sold seperately. To this day,that engine still runs.

Blurple240
07-13-2005, 07:21 AM
I broke in my Scion xB this way. I picked it up with 3 miles on the odo. Currently it's at ~14,500 miles. Unfortunately I have to sell it before any long term results can be found. But so far, it's running great. Burns no oil, the valve train is quiet, etc.

However, I don't think it really matters, as engines are pretty much broken in already upon delivery.

HolyShiznit
07-13-2005, 09:04 AM
For the record, Ivan from PhatKA-T breaks in his motors as per the hard/no break in procedure. Just let it idle to make sure all the connections are fine, change oil then BAM straight to the dyno. Also Fiznat/Foster on KA-T.org broke in his new motor just like that and made 430rwhp @ 20 psi. He did a write-up and said his motor was fine, oil was pretty, idled clean, etc etc. Personally this method is what I am using.

TS4l
07-13-2005, 09:33 AM
On my Sr20 I let it idle for 20 mins and checked the timing, then changed the oil, put new oil in and went for a casual drive for about 25 miles, then straight to the dyno and boosted it and checked the A/F ratio's. I say either way will be fine, only thing I suggest is during the first 1000 miles change your oil a lot. I changed mine every 100 miles just to make sure I didn't see any metal shavings or anything! Either way if you built it right it will be ok.

steve shadows
07-13-2005, 12:14 PM
change the oil once after a decent 2k idle then rail the [censored] out of it.

Taffy
07-16-2005, 01:38 AM
If he is running Moly rings, the rings are not going to seat in that short of a time span.

We have guys around here with 8 second nitrous pigs that used to run moly rings and break in at 2500 rpm for 20 minutes to get them to seat. With the newer style rings, you do not need to seat the rings as long.

Taffy
07-16-2005, 01:39 AM
The initial rings seating is not supposed to be done on the initial drive. Some do it, but they are the ones with lower average compression.

Taffy
07-16-2005, 01:41 AM
For the record, Ivan from PhatKA-T breaks in his motors as per the hard/no break in procedure. Just let it idle to make sure all the connections are fine, change oil then BAM straight to the dyno. Also Fiznat/Foster on KA-T.org broke in his new motor just like that and made 430rwhp @ 20 psi. He did a write-up and said his motor was fine, oil was pretty, idled clean, etc etc. Personally this method is what I am using.



Like I said above, if you are using moly rings, you need to have a break in to seat the rings properly.

Just because you get good horsepower, does not necessarily mean the rings are seated.

You can verify this with a compression test/leak down test. That is one thing that I never hear about guys doing after a dyno pass. The test is the only way to see if the rings are seated properly.

Vapor
07-16-2005, 08:57 AM
I have to disagree Taffy. If the rings are not seated, they will leak combustion pressure, yes? Combustion pressure is measured by tq and hp, most commonly quantified on a dyno. If rings were not seated, and oil smoke was not present, and it didn't affect hp, do tell me then, whats the effect? I'm not following you...

Jsquared
07-16-2005, 09:11 PM
anyone ever been to the BMW factory in SC? What's the first thing all the cars do with freshly-assembled engines do when they roll off the production line? 10-20 foot drive onto a "rolling-road device" (dyno) for a "speedometer check" (WOT through the first 4 gears to 120mph+). They use this initial break-in procedure for all the engines, even the M cars.