PDA

View Full Version : What exactly is "slipping the clutch" and how do I avoid it?



Natty
03-27-2002, 10:19 PM
What exactly is slipping the clutch? I have had a few different people tell me different things. I killed a perfect clutch in 2,000 miles and I don't wanna do it again ($600)

For example, when upshifting, I will clutch in, shift, and then slowly clutch out. In this time, the revs on the tach have gone from maybe 3000 when I cluthced in to 1500 and then when I slowly let the clutch out, the revs move at a contant rate to 2500 and I start to gas it. Could that do it, slowly letting the clutch out instead of just droping it?
Thanks,
Jeff

[ 03-27-2002, 10:20 PM: Message edited by: Natty ]

nmap
03-27-2002, 10:29 PM
take it from a fellow VWV member (i saw your posts there too http://www.freshalloy.com/ ) let your clutch out faster, just kind of learn where your RPM will be when you shift from 1-2, 2-3, 3-4, 4-5.

say your shifting at 3k in first gear, and your going 20mph. and you know your car is geared to be at 2000rpm at 20mph in 2nd gear, you want to let the clutch out closer to 2000 rpm. by not pulling your foot out of the clutch soon enough, your slipping the clutch as the clutch tries to mediate (grab) the difference between how fast your wheels are spinning, and how fast your engine is spinning.

it just sounds to me like your leaving your foot on the clutch too long, and EVERY up shift your slipping it ~500 rpm or so. that's not too good.

nmap
03-27-2002, 10:59 PM
also try not to gas it while your still partially in and out of the clutch.

imagine your holding a stick with both hands, how fast the stick is your engine, the skin on your hands is your clutch, and your hands are your wheels. now imagine that the stick is tuning at a constant speed, and your trying to keep hold of it, while the stick is still and your hands have full traction your not causing much wear on the clutch (your skin). but now think about what happens if someone tries to grab the stick, and twists the hell out of it while you've only got a partial grip (like when your halfway in and out of the clutch). well chances are the stick is going to be fine, and you know that 99 times out of 100 your not going to break an arm, but the skin on your hands is going to be pretty scratched up and worn.

sorry, that's the best i can explain it. if that analogy made any sense at all you can also see why dumping the clutch (spinning the stick to 3000 rpm then trying to grab it with both hands and keep a solid hold) hurts your clutch

[ 03-27-2002, 11:03 PM: Message edited by: nmap ]

**DONOTDELETE**
03-28-2002, 05:48 AM
Jeff, maybe you should just try to let the clutch out a little faster. And try to synchronise the clutch and the gas pedal together, so you don't get a whiplash and don't look like it's the first time you drive a manual car every time you shift http://www.freshalloy.com/

Nmap's analogy is good. If your clutch is partly gripping, and the engine is reving, then it burns the clutch. The problem is that both the clutch pedal and the gas pedal are pushed at once. And it's during that short period of time that your clutch burns and wears.

Go in a parking lot, and practice engaging every gear just in time, and try not slipping your clutch. The ride might seem harder at first, and the engine could even stall, but you'll get use to it, and end up shifting smoothly without slipping and burning the clutch.

Hope this helps!

lenso
03-28-2002, 06:03 AM
When i first learned how to drive a manual, i used to keep the revs at 3000rpm because of my newbie skills would cause the engine to either bog or die at anything less. After a couple of times driving, I learned how to keep the revs lower and not look like a dumbass. One reason that to avoid a slipping clutch is to keep the revs lower and don't stay on the clutch too long. Once you feel the clutch engage, try to release it as quick as possible(but do it transitionally not a quick OUT).

Natty
03-28-2002, 07:41 AM
Originally posted by LSo-RPS13:
When i first learned how to drive a manual, i used to keep the revs at 3000rpm because of my newbie skills would cause the engine to either bog or die at anything less. After a couple of times driving, I learned how to keep the revs lower and not look like a dumbass. One reason that to avoid a slipping clutch is to keep the revs lower and don't stay on the clutch too long. Once you feel the clutch engage, try to release it as quick as possible(but do it transitionally not a quick OUT).<font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial[/img]Ok, I got that. The stick analogy works good too http://www.freshalloy.com/
So just wait until the clutch is fully enaged before I start to gas?
Oh, does the tach measure the speed of the transmission/clutch or the flywheel/engine speed?

nmap
03-28-2002, 07:44 AM
engine speed. it's the rpm refers to how fast the crank is turning.

haha. yay. my stick analogy worked. not too shabby for like 1 in the morning off the top of my head =D

mzf
03-28-2002, 11:59 AM
Don't forget that with a new clutch you also have to break it in properly. That means for the first 500 miles or so you have to drive like a granny. No slipping it. No hard launches. No revving it high.

Natty
03-28-2002, 06:13 PM
Originally posted by mzf:
That means for the first 500 miles or so you have to drive like a granny. No slipping it.<font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial[/img]That's why I am asking this http://www.freshalloy.com/
God, I hope I don't kill this one too. I like standard more than auto and I like my 240sx more than a Honda econobox.
Jeff