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**DONOTDELETE**
09-17-2000, 10:00 PM
I think it might be a tech question, but why aren't diesel vehicles popular in the USofA ???

It would IMHO make an extreme sense to put diesel engines into these behemoths of the day, Sport-Futility Vehicles.

thearabian
09-18-2000, 09:01 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial[/img]quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Poligraf:
I think it might be a tech question, but why aren't diesel vehicles popular in the USofA ???

It would IMHO make an extreme sense to put diesel engines into these behemoths of the day, Sport-Futility Vehicles.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Because i think americans like fast cars that accelerate hard...
BMW has it's 7 series that runs on diesel, the 740dL has soo much torque and very decent horsepower. its a marvelous engine
then again BMW has an engine that runs on Hydrogen or Gasoline, it's in one car the 750hL, it's a variation of the BMW V12. Biproduct: pure water... but where do you fill up?

ChuckH
09-18-2000, 11:26 PM
I think it's mostly due to the fact that we pay about half as much for fuel. Also, the American public associates diesels with sluggish performance and black, nasty exhaust, despite the fact that technology now makes diesl cars perform as well as gas powered cars.

<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial[/img]quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Poligraf:
I think it might be a tech question, but why aren't diesel vehicles popular in the USofA ???

It would IMHO make an extreme sense to put diesel engines into these behemoths of the day, Sport-Futility Vehicles.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

JonCarson
09-19-2000, 03:29 PM
Good ol' boys (and girls) who are serious about hauling with their trucks (a lot of my family up in Idaho) do favor diesels actually.

It's hard to beat a diesel V8 or 10 if you're looking for gobs of torque to haul your work and/or your toys around.

Nismo
09-22-2000, 10:51 AM
Emissions. While diesel fuel has a higher fuel-value than gasoline, it's also very dirty when combusted. Those extra long hydrocarbon chains mean more power as they combust into C02 and H20, but the longer chains also make it harder to combust completely. Diesel-burning engines emit more tailpipe pollutants than gas engines.

In europe and most other parts of the world, automotive emissions regulations are pathetic. In the U.S., emissions regulations are much more stringent.

thearabian
09-22-2000, 03:57 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial[/img]quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Nismo:
Emissions. While diesel fuel has a higher fuel-value than gasoline, it's also very dirty when combusted. Those extra long hydrocarbon chains mean more power as they combust into C02 and H20, but the longer chains also make it harder to combust completely. Diesel-burning engines emit more tailpipe pollutants than gas engines.

In europe and most other parts of the world, automotive emissions regulations are pathetic. In the U.S., emissions regulations are much more stringent.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

I'm not a scientist but it seems odd for me that diesel engines are OK for emissions in the US but the Direct-injection models of nissan engined are not welcome...

someone care to elaborate?

JonCarson
09-22-2000, 04:59 PM
I don't know the specifics of it, but I've heard that the direct injection engines require at higher octane fuels than are available here in the US. Keep in mind that other contries get 96 octane and sometimes higher, but we're limited to a maximum of 93. Most places around San Diego only have 92 as their premium fuel.

**DONOTDELETE**
09-22-2000, 07:11 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial[/img]quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by carsonjon:
I don't know the specifics of it, but I've heard that the direct injection engines require at higher octane fuels than are available here in the US. Keep in mind that other contries get 96 octane and sometimes higher, but we're limited to a maximum of 93. Most places around San Diego only have 92 as their premium fuel.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Not octane.
American-spec fuel contains too much sulfur. One of the reasons that make the gas extremely expensive in Japan and Europe is its cleanness of sulfur. The problem is that too much sulfur ruins the specific catalitic converter put into the direct-injection cars.